The following are the presenters for Charting cialis prix officine Imperial Itineraries, 1914-2014: Unmooring the Komagata Maru. For a detailed list of presentation abstracts or schedule information, please visit:

Schedule  Presentation Abstracts

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A PDF version of the Presenter Biographies is also available here.

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Satwinder Kaur Bains

Satwinder is the Director of the Centre for Indo-Canadian Studies at the University of the Fraser Valley. She is also an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Arts, Canada India Studies. Her current research interests include: cross-cultural education curriculum implementation; migration and integration; race and ethnicity; women’s rights and cultural politics; Diaspora studies, Sikhism and the politics of identity. Her professional background has included serving as diversity educator, community developer and community activist in the areas of women’s rights, youth development, race and anti-racism and immigrant settlement integration. Satwinder has been featured in Canadian Literature and is currently a PhD Candidate at Simon Fraser University.

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Davina Bhandar

Davina is a Professor in the Department of Canadian Studies at Trent University (Peterborough, Ontario). Her current research engages in contemporary critiques of the concept of citizenship that have emerged through notions of transnationalism and politics of diaspora, particularly focused on examining the notion of the migrant concept of citizenship. This includes the examination of citizenship practices from “below” or rather through acts of governance, freedom, migration and immigration. Her academic and teaching work includes the fields of contemporary political and social theory, critical race studies, post-colonial theory and feminist theory. Davina has recently published  “Renormalizing Life and Citizenship in Fortress North America” (Citizenship Studies), in addition to several other works in the The Johns Hopkins Guide to Literary Theory and Criticism, 2nd Edition and the Routledge Feminist Encyclopedia.

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Nandi Bhatia

Nandi is currently the Associate Dean – Faculty of Research and Graduate Studies (Arts and Humanities) at the University of Western Ontario, where she is also a Professor of English. Her research interests include British imperial and South Asian Colonial and Post-colonial literatures. She is currently working on a SSHRC funded project on the relationship between colonial censorship and literary movements in Indian from 1858- 1947. She has recently published Performing Women/Performing Womanhood: Theatre, Politics and Dissent (2010, Oxford University Press) as well as an article on South Asian voices in Canadian Drama in Studies in Social Justice.

Suchetana Chattopadhyay

Suchetana is an Assistant Professor of History at Jadavpur University (Calcutta, India). Her research interests include intersections of power, communism in India, working class movements, twentieth century Calcutta, and colonial surveillance. Her most recent project focuses on communism in Calcutta between 1913 and 1929 – An tadalafil 10mg early communist: Muzaffar Ahmad in Calcutta, 1913-1929 (2012, Tulika Publishers, New Delhi).

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Rita Kaur Dhamoon

Rita is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Victoria (Victoria, BC). Her research interests have centred on issues of identity/difference politics and power, including multicultural policies and theories, culture, Canadian nation-building, gender politics and feminism, intersectionality, critical race studies, post-colonial and anti-colonial politics, democratic politics. As well as journal articles and book chapters, she has published a book called Identity/Difference Politics: How Difference is Produced and Why it Matters(UBC Press, 2009), and co-edited book on Sexual Justice/Cultural Justice (Routledge 2007) with Barbara Arneil, Avigail Eisenberg, and Monique Deveaux . Her current research program is grounded in critical race feminism, and includes: a book project on Sikhs in Canada and nation-building; intersectionality and solidarity politics between people of colour and Indigenous people; an intersectional analysis of the Canadian Museum of Human Rights, with Dr. Olena Hankivsky (SFU).

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Enakshi Dua

Enakshi is currently the Director of the Centre for Feminist Research, at York University. She teaches critical race theory, anti-racist feminist theory, post-colonial studies and feminist theory. She has extensively published on theorizing racism and anti-racism, the racialised and gendered histories of immigration processes, racism in Canadian Universities, equity policies and anti-racism policies and the racialization of masculinity and femininity. She has also published on women and health and globalization and biodiversity. Her notable publications include Scratching the Surface: Canadian Anti-Racist Feminist Thought, The Hindu Woman Question, From Subjects To Aliens: Indian Migrants, The Racialization of Canadian Citizenship and Decolonizing Anti-Racism. She has a forthcoming co-edited publication Theorizing Anti-Racism: Linkages in Marxism and Critical Race Theories (University of Toronto Press). She has more than 30 years of experience in anti-racist work in the community as well as within the academy. Within the academy, she has held a number of administrative positions that deal with gender, anti-racist, and equity issues. She has served as Chair of the CAUT Equity Committee, the co-chair of the Sub-committee to the Joint Committee of the Collective Agreement on Equity, at Queen’s University, as well as the York University Faculty Association’s Equity Officer.

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Ian Fletcher

Ian is an Associate Professor at Georgia State University. His research interests include social movements, political contention, and imperial culture during the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. His teaching focuses on modern British, Irish, imperial, and world history and has been co-edited several publications and been published in Radical World History and has a forthcoming work on the Edwardian Crisis and imperialism in World History Bulletin.

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Ayesha Hameed

Ayesha is the Joint Programme Leader in Fine Art and History of Art in the Department of Visual Cultures at Goldsmiths, University of London. Her practice includes performance, video and writing, and examines borders, migration and detention. Publications include contributions to Photoworks, Place: Location and Belonging in New Media Contexts and Tate ETC and future exhibitions include group exhibitions with the Forensic Architecture Project at the House of World Cultures in Berlin.

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Nadia Hasan

Nadia is a PhD candidate in the Department of Political Science at York University.  Her research interests include postcolonial, feminist, and critical race theories, the women’s movement in Pakistan, and intersections of Islam and gender.  She holds an Honours B.A. in Economics and International Relations from the University of Toronto and an M.A. in Political Science from York University.  Nadia has spent several years working with various NGOs in Toronto and Pakistan and has taught at the Lahore University of Management Sciences. Currently, she is working on her dissertation project on theorizing women’s agency in Pakistan.

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Rajender Kaur

Rajender is an Associate Professor of English at the William Paterson University of New Jersey. His research focuses on Postcolonial Theory and Literature, in particular South Asian and South Asian American literatures and cultures. In addition, his work in the fields of history and culture, gender studies, class and social justice issues are grounded by an interest in literary theory. Rajender has recently been featured in South Asian Popular Culture, as well as a chapter in Mother and Daughter: Complicated Connections across Cultures (2012, University Press of America).

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Sailaja Krishnamurti

Sailaja has a Ph.D. and holds a position at the Centre for Asian Studies, at York University. Her research interests include representations of migration; race, gender, sexuality; diaspora and transnationalism in literature and theory; visual culture and comics; South Asian history, politics, religions. She is co-author of Organizing the Transnational: Labour, Politics, and Social Change (2008), and “Queue-jumbers, terrorists, breeders: representations of Tamil migrants in Canadian popular media,” (2013) South Asian Diaspora, 5:1.

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Tariq Malik

Tariq is a Vancouver-based author, writer and poet whose past experience has included feature writing for The Kuwait Times and editor of The Kuwait Weekender. His current writing interests focus on the relationship between Indian migration and Indian politics. One of his current projects, “The Last Lohar”, traces the personal histories of Punjabi migrant workers in the Arabian Gulf. As part of Charting Imperial Itineraries, 1914-2014: Unmooring the Komagata Maru, Tariq will be featured at a key note public event, “Still Chanting Denied Shores”, where he will present topics from his novel, Chanting Denied Shores (2010, Bayeux Arts) as well as an unpublished poem, “Hugging the Shore”.

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Ashok Mathur

Ashok is an Associate Professor in English and Modern Language at the University of British Columbia, Okanagan, where he also sits as the Canada Research Chair in Culture and Artistic Inquiry. His research expertise revolves around cultural representations of memory, race and culture, migration, and gender and race. Currently, he is the lead editor of “Cultivating Canada: Reconciliation through the Lens of Cultural Diversity (2011, Aboriginal Healing Foundation). His other works include his novels, A Little Distillery in Nowgong (2012, Arsenal Pulp Press) and Once Upon an Elephant (2006, Arsenal Pulp Press) as well as a SSHRC funded project report, “Possibilizing the Impossible: equity in postsecondary arts institutes”.

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Renisa Mawani

Renisa is Associate Professor of Sociology and the inaugural Chair of the Law and Society Minor Program at the University of British Columbia (2009-2010).  She works on the conjoined histories of indigeneity, migration, and settler colonialism and has published widely in the area of law and colonialism. Her articles have appeared in journals including, Law and Society Review, Annual Review of Law and Social Science, Environment and Planning D, Law/Text/Culture, Social and Legal Studies, Social Identities, Theory, Culture, and Society, and Cultural Geographies.  Her first book, Colonial Proximities: Crossracial Contacts and Juridical Truths in British Columbia, 1871-1921 (2009) details the dynamic encounters between aboriginal peoples, Chinese migrants, mixed-race populations, and Europeans in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth-centuries. Her second book, Across Oceans of Law (in progress), is a global history of

the Komagata Maru narrated through time, law, and empire.

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Radhika Mongia

Radhika is an Associate Professor of Sociology at York University where she is also involved with graduate programs in Sociology, Women’s and Gender Studies, and Social and Political Thought. Her research interests span across diaspora studies, empire, migration, the relationship between slavery and other imperial practices, colonialism and the modern state, transnationalism, nationalism, and gender studies. Her recent publications include a forthcoming book, Genealogies of Globalization: Migration, Colonialism, and the State (2013, Permanent Black Press), and a chapter in the anthology, Beyond Methodological Nationalism: Research Methodologies for Transnational Studies (2012, Routledge).

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Kaori Mizukami

Kaori is a PhD student at the University of Tokyo in Asian History. Her research interests include the history of modern India, the history of Indian National Movements, and the history of immigration especially Indian immigrants. Her previous graduate work focused on East Indian immigrants and Indian Revolutionaries in the Pacific Northwest during 1900-1914, which served as her thesis topic for her Master of Arts (2013, University of Tokyo).

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Milan Singh

Milan is a doctoral candidate in the School of Communication at Simon Fraser University. Her SSHRC funded research project focuses on the Canadian government’s Commission of Inquiry into the Bombing of Air India Flight 182. Using legal documents, public testimony from the Air India Inquiry, and media reports, her research project attempts to understand the complexities surrounding Canadian citizenship, and security and anti-terrorism policy.

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Prabhsharanbir Singh

Prabhsharanbir is a Ph.D. student in the Interdisciplinary Studies Graduate Program at the University of British Columbia. His research interests include South Asian Studies, Postcolonialism, Psychoanalysis, Continental Philosophy and Philosophy of Technology. His research will focus on the emergence of postcolonial subjectivities with particular emphasis on the role of technology in the construction of subjectivity. His publications include “Stolen Bodies and Ravished Souls: Sikh Experience Meets Colonial Power.” Sikh Formations, Volume 5, Issue 2, December  2009; and “Sakhi, Vyakhya and the Self: Some Reflections on ‘Chaubole Mahla 5” Sikh Formations, Volume 4, Issue 2 December 2008.

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Seema Sohi

Seema is an Assistant Professor of Ethnic Studies at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Her research experience include focuses on radical anticolonial politics of South Asian intellectuals and migrant workers in the United States during the early twentieth century, as well as an interdisciplinary interest in Asian American history, transnational political movements, and South Asian diasporic studies. Her recent publications include “Radical Migrations: Race, Surveillance, and Indian Anticolonialism in North America” (manuscript under review, Oxford University Press), as well as an article in Journal of American History.

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Alia Somani

Arvind-Pal is an Associate Professor of Sikh Studies at Michigan State University. His research focus includes the intersections of various disciplines, such as: Modern European Philosophy and Comparative Philosophy, Postcoloniality, Colonial History of India, Postcolonial theory, Critical Theories of Religion and the Secular, and Hermeneutics. His recent publications include Secularism and Religion-Making (2011, Oxford University Press) and Religion and the Specter of the West: Sikhism, India, Postcoloniality and the Politics of Translation (2009, Columbia University Press).

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Irina Spector-Marks

Irina is currently a PhD student in History at the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana. Her research interests include examination of Indian responses to anti-Indian immigration legislation in South Africa and Canada throughout the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. She also focuses on the relationship between the transnational circulation of print culture and imperial British citizenship which Indians used to claim rights of free migration. She has presented a paper, “Racing the Imperial Citizen: Competing Visions of the Komagata Maru” at the “Boarders and Boundaries” conference (Central Michigan University, April 2012).

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Nayani Thiyagarajah

Nayani has worked extensively with multiple community-based organizations and performance groups across Toronto, including Manifesto Community Projects, The Remix Project, ArtReach Toronto, b.current Performing Arts, and Schools Without Borders. She is documentary and film maker and producer. Having completed my Bachelor of Journalism at Ryerson University, she is now working towards her M.A. in Interdisciplinary Studies at York Univeristy (diaspora/performance/women’s studies). She is also training as a full circle doula with the International Centre for Traditional Childbearing.

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Nishant Upadhyay

Nishant is a Ph.D. candidate in Graduate Programme in Social and Political Thought, at York University. His research interests include South Asia and the South Asian diaspora in Canada, with a focus on the entangled histories between Indigenous and immigrant subjects. His doctoral work focuses on South Asian communities in Canada and their relationships to Canadian settler colonialism and Indigenous peoples.

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